Posts Tagged ‘Server’

How to verify if the WMI is working fine on the Server?

ANS: Open Command prompt in Administrator mode and run the below command:

winmgmt /verifyrepository

If the WMI is working fine, then you get message as WMI is consistent, or else you get the error code.

Below is the link for the Error code reference for WMI

MS Article Link

Depended on the scope of error you need to troubleshoot further.

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Alert: This source server failed to generate the changes

Description: This directory service failed to retrieve the changes requested for the following directory partition. As a result, it was unable to send change requests to the directory service at the following network address.

1479

Event ID: 1479

Active Directory Domain Services could not update the following object in the local Active Directory Domain Services database with changes received from the following source directory service. Active Directory Domain Services does not have enough database version store to apply the changes.

User Action

Restart this directory service. If this does not solve the problem, increase the size of the database version store. If you are populating the objects with a large number of values, or the size of the values is especially large, decrease the size of future changes.

 

Additional Data

Error value:

8573 The database is out of version store.

 

Resolution:

{MS has provided the resolution in this Link}

Note: Take Backup of Registry before changing

 

Registry Location:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\NTDS\Parameters

 

You need to add the Registry value “EDB max ver pages” with 32 Bit DWord Decimal value as you need with reference below:

9600 = 152 MB
12800 = 202 MB
16000 = 252 MB
19200 = 302 MB

Reboot the Server once the changes have been done.

Check the Event viewer after restart; you need to get event 1394 in ADS Logs

1394

Summary:  Group Policy application seems straightforward enough: Group Policy Objects (GPOs) are linked to organizational units (OUs); users and computers are in OUs. All the GPOs from a user’s OU hierarchy filter down to the user.

Things get more complicated, though, when you remember that GPOs can be linked to a domain and to sites—meaning you’ll have to open a whole new console to see what’s going on. You also have to consider local security policies, which exist solely on the client computer and are applied before any domain-based policies arrive. Throw in options such as Block Policy Inheritance, No Override, and loopback processing, and it’s no wonder why there’s such a robust market for third-party GPO tools. However, with some patience and a methodology, you can do quite a bit of quality troubleshooting on your own.

Start from the Scratch

Too many administrators try to start at the top, working their way down the hierarchy of GPOs and figuring out which ones apply. That method is time-consuming, error-prone, and just plain boring. It’s a lot easier to start at the bottom—the client—and work your way up the tree. Windows XP’s Gpresult tool, for example, is a great troubleshooting tool. Run from the command line, it will tell you which groups the current user is a member of (which can affect GPO application), and give you a list of every GPO that is currently affecting the user. You’ll also see the last time that GPOs were applied to the computer. What Gpresult is displaying is called resultant set of policy (RSOP). It sorts through all the blocked inheritance, no overrides, and conflicting policies to sort out exactly which policies are being applied.

By default, Gpresult doesn’t show you which individual policies are applied or what they are set to; because GPOs successively overwrite one another as they are applied, you can still be left with a troubleshooting task to figure out which of the GPOs listed is responsible for the settings you’re seeing. Fortunately, Gpresult has a “superverbose” mode, enabled by running

Gpresult /z

This mode not only displays which GPOs have been applied, but lists every single policy that’s enabled in each GPO, allowing you to see which GPO modified which setting, and which GPO finally won out in the end. Figure 36.1 shows a portion of Gpresult’s superverbose output. In this example, the GPO being applied is Local Group Policy, and you can see exactly which registry keys each setting is modifying.

Superverbose mode also breaks down the user and computer policies, allowing you to see every setting that is affecting the current users or their machines.

 

  1. Active Directory contains information about all objects and their attributes. The attributes hold data that describes the resource that the directory object identifies. Because information about all network resources is stored in Active Directory, a single administrator can centrally manage and administer network resources.
  2. Active Directory can be queried by using protocols such as LDAP. Administrators can easily locate information about objects by searching for selected attributes of the object, using tools that support LDAP.
  3. Active Directory allows you to group objects with similar administrative and security requirements into organizational units. Organizational units provide multiple levels of administrative authority for both applying Group Policy settings and delegating administrative control. This delegation of administrative authority simplifies the task of managing these objects and allows administrators to structure Active Directory to fit their needs.
  4. Active Directory uses Group Policy to provide administrators with the ability to specify Group Policy settings for a site, domain, or organizational unit. Active Directory then enforces these Group Policy settings for all of the users and computers within the container.

 

Record type

Name

Description

A Address Record Maps a hostname to an IP address
PTR Pointer Record Maps an IP address to a hostname
CNAME Alias Record Maps an alias to a hostname
MX Mail Exchanger Record Specifies a mail route for a domain
NS Name Server Record Specifies name servers for a given domain
SOA Start of Authority Record Contains administrative data about a zone, including the primary name server
SRV Service Record Maps a particular service (e.g., LDAP) to one or more hostnames

One important resource record to note is the SRV record type. SRV records are used extensively by domain controllers and Active Directory clients to locate servers that have a particular service.

 

Note: Make sure to backup the information of the tasks scheduled.

Symptoms:

–          Error while trying to open the Configured Tasks.

–          Error while trying to access the properties of the tasks.

–          Status message of tasks as: “Could not Start”

–          This normally happens in Microsoft Windows 2003 / 2003 R2

Error

Could_not_start

 

Resolution:

–          Stop the “Task Scheduler “Service.

–          Delete all the files in this path: C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data\Microsoft\Crypto\RSA\S- 1 – 5 – 18

–          Restart the Service and check if it works.

–          If not then restart the server.

–          The issue will be resolved.

Symptoms:

–          The Server service fails to start and the below events are recorded

Event ID: 7023

Source: Service Control manager

Type: Error

Description: The Server service terminated with the following error: More data is available.

–          Not Enough storage is available to process this command.

Event ID: 7001

Source: Service Control manager

Type: Error

Description: The Netlogon service depends on the server service which failed to start because of the following error: More data is available.

–          System Error 8 has occurred. Not enough storage is available to process this command.

–          If you try to start the Server Service manually, the following errors may occur: A System error has occurred: System Error 234 has occurred.

–          You will not be able to execute any command in the Server.

–          You get error message when you open the Network connections (ncpa.cpl)

Observations:

–          Other services may fail to start because these services are dependent on the Server Service.

–          The Server service queries the registry value above for its entries. The buffer for the amount of information that the Server service can accept when it queries is approximately 32 KB. If there are more than 32 KB in that entry, the Server service will fail to start and return the error “More data is available,” or “Not enough storage is available.”

–          It looks like certain software’s can also cause for this error, those maybe the Norton Antivirus, Acronis trueImage, Seagate DiscWizard, IBM antivirus, Microsoft Bitdefender, Symantec Endpoint Protection or AVG, Try Disabling them or uninstalling and check if the problem persists.

–          You can instantly rectify this error if you restart the server, but the error re-occurs in 2 to 3 days.

Resolution:

PLEASE BACKUP YOUR REGISTRY FIRST BEFORE YOU MAKE ANY CHANGES

This issue may be cause of two reasons, one is the NullSessionPipes and the other is IRPStackSize.

  1. NullSessionPipes

The Cause of these errors is due to too much data stored in the following registry key:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanmanServer\Parameters\NullSessionPipes

The Server service queries the registry value above for its entries. The buffer for the amount of information that the Server service can accept when it queries is approximately 32 KB. If there are more than 32 KB in that entry, the Server service will fail to start and return the error “More data is available,” or “Not enough storage is available.”

The Solution is to remove any unnecessary entries from this value in the registry.

The Default information stored in this key is:

COMNAP

COMNODE

SQL\QUERY

SPOOLSS

LLSRPC

EPMAPPER

LOCATOR

  1. IRPStackSize

Go to the below Registry entry to edit the IRPStackSize

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanmanServer\Parameters

If you do not have the Registry entry then create one manually, but make sure the name should be correct as it is case sensitive.

To create the Registry entry follow the below steps:

–          Open REGEDIT

–          Proceed to the following location: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanmanServer\Parameters

–          Click Edit, and point to New and then click DWORD Value

–          Type IRPStackSize , Click Edit and then modify the Value

–          The Value should be 0x00000050 in Hexadecimal or 80 in Decimal. This should resolve your issue, normally values are provided to 1 to 15 in decimal notation. Better if you provide higher value so that the problem doesn’t come back.

–          Restart the Server after the changes are done.

You may get the error message as below:

Symptoms:

–          Not able to login to Domain Controllers due to low disk space in the systems drive.

–          You get the above error message and the server reboots every time.

–          Users not able to login in the particular network.

–          Users not able to access the shared resources from the Domain Controller.

 

Resolution:

–          Reboot the server and login using Windows directory restore mode.

–          Go To Start > Run and type ‘Cleanmgr’ and clean up the drive space of C

–          If you have lost the Restore Mode password then follow the below steps to reset the DSRM Password:

Go to Command Prompt from the nearest Domain Controller and type the below command:

ntdsutil

set dsrm password

reset password on server ServerName

–          Once you have cleared the Space in the Systems drive, reboot the Server.

–          After Reboot login normally to the Domain Controller and everything should be back to normal.

–         Everyone should be able to access the Shared Resources from the Server.

Procedure to Configure System State Backup:

Note: The Account must be a Domain Admin Account to perform the System State Backup.

To Back Up the System State:

To back up the system state (including the registry hives system, software, security, the Security Accounts Manager (SAM), and the default user (but not HKEY_CURRENT_USER)), follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Backup. The Backup or Restore Wizard starts.
  2. Click Advanced Mode.
  3. Click the Backup tab.
  4. On the Job menu, click New.
  5. Click to select the System State check box.
  6. In the Backup destination box, specify the destination for the new job.
  7. In the Backup media or file namebox, do the following:
    • If you are backing up to a file, specify a path and file name for the backup (.bkf) file. Or, click Browse, specify a file name and location where you want to save the file, and then click Save.
    • If the NAS is available save it to \\NASName\Backup location
    • If NAS is not available, save it to some Local Machine and make note of this local machine. Make sure that the destination location or drive has enough free space.
  8. Click Start Backup.
  9. If you want to set advanced backup options, such as data verification or hardware compressions, click Advanced. Specify the options that you want, and then click OK.
  10. Review the settings on the Backup Job Information page. Specify whether you want this backup to replace the information that is already present on the destination media, or add this backup to the existing information.
  11. Click Start Backup.

 

For Restore Procedure click here