Posts Tagged ‘technology’

 

This Alert occurs in 2008 R2 Servers

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Alert: Active Directory cannot update object due to insufficient memory
Last modified by: System
Last modified time: 7/18/2013 1:02:10 PM
Alert description: Active Directory Domain Services could not update the following object in the local Active Directory Domain Services database with changes received from the following source directory service. Active Directory Domain Services does not have enough database version store to apply the changes.

User Action

Restart this directory service. If this does not solve the problem, increase the size of the database version store. If you are populating the objects with a large number of values, or the size of the values is especially large, decrease the size of future changes.

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Additional Data

Reboot will clear the version table but it does nothing to identify or resolve the core issue.

The version store has reached its maximum size because of unresponsive transaction. Updates to database are rejected until the long-running transaction is omitted or rolled back. TechNet suggested looking for event IDs-1022, 1069,623 and none of these event ids could be found in event viewer.

Resolution:

Below is the solution but it is your own risk to change registry setting.

 Backup the Registry before Proceeding

 

  1. Update ‘Version Store Size’ (the Ops Mgr Agent queue/cache Db) by using Regedit to change  “HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\HealthService\Parameters\”Persistence Version Store Maximum”. 
    Value should be 5120 (decimal) (equates to 80MB).
  2. Update value for ‘MaximumQueueSizeKb’ in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\HealthService\Parameters\Management Groups\<ManagementGroupName> Value should be 102400 (decimal)

 “Please reboot the server”

Check in the Event Viewer for Event ID 1394 “All Problems preventing updates to the Active Directory Domain Services database have been cleared. New Updates to the Active Directory Domain Services database are succeeding. The Net Logon service has restarted”

You can find this event in “Directory Services” Log of the Domain Controller.

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Introduction

Replication ensures that all information in Active Directory is current on all domain controllers and client computers across your entire network. Many networks consist of a number of smaller networks, and the network links between these networks may operate at varying speeds. Sites in Active Directory enable you to control replication traffic and other types of traffic related to Active Directory across these various network links. You can use subnet objects, site links, and site link bridges to help control the replication topology when configuring replication between sites. An efficient, reliable replication topology depends on the configuration of site links and site link bridges.

 

What Are Sites and Subnet Objects?

 

Introduction

You use sites to control replication traffic, logon traffic, and requests to the Global Catalog server.

 

Sites

In Active Directory, sites help define the physical structure of a network. A site is defined by a set of Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) subnet address ranges. Sites are used to define a group of domain controllers that are well-connected in terms of speed and cost. Sites consist of server objects, which contain connection objects that enable replication.

 

Subnet Objects

The TCP/IP subnet address ranges are represented by subnet objects that group computers. For example, a subnet object might represent all the computers on a floor in a building, or on a campus. Subnet objects are associated with sites and, because the subnet objects map to the physical network, so do the sites. For example, if you have three subnets that represent three campuses in a city, and these campuses are connected by high-speed, highly available connections, you could associate each of those subnets with the same site. A site can consist of one or more subnets. For example, on a network with three subnets in London and two in Boston, the administrator can create a site in London, a site in Boston, and then add the subnets to the respective sites.

 

Default Site

A default site is set up automatically when you install Windows Server on the first domain controller in a forest. This site is called Default-First-Site- Name. This site can be renamed. When you create your first domain in a forest it is automatically placed in the default site.